King Monmouth! A Mini-Campaign of the Rebellion of 1685


A Volley & Bayonet Mini-Campaign by K. Aldridge, October 2004.

Game Outline:

1.0   Introduction
2.0   Scale
3.0   Sequence of Play
4.0   Rebel Disasters
5.0   Fleeing
6.0   Game Start and Set-up
7.0   Government Reaction

8.0   Victory
9.0   Orders of Battle

1.0 Introduction:

Monmouth’s Rebellion in the West Country, 1685. Can be used to generate miniatures battles.

2.0 Scale: 

1 map hex = 2 miles; 1 turn = 2 days; 1 muster point = 50 men.

3.0 Sequence of Play:

  • 3.1 Events Phase 
  • 3.2 Rebel Operations Phase
  • 3.3 Government Operations Phase
  • 3.4 Combat Phase

3.1 Events Phase:

The Rebel player rolls 2D6 and refers to the Events Chart below:

Roll:

Event: 

2 Rebel Deserters. Roll 1D6 per 600 current rebels in arms (rounding up). Total x 100 is number of deserters. Apply immediately.
3 Rebel Deserters. Roll 1D6 per 1200 current rebels in arms (rounding up). Total x 100 is number of deserters. Apply immediately.
4-5 Rebel gun breaks down. Roll 1D6; result 1-3 and gun is repaired, 4-6 and gun is useless for the rest of the game.
6-8 No event.
9-10 Roll once on Government Militia Table.
11-12 Roll twice on Government Militia Table.


3.1.2 Government Militia Table.

3.1.2.1 Procedure: Roll 2D6. The first roll refers to the appropriate column and the second to a large town in which militia friendly to the Government have mustered. Ignore repeated results (but do not repeat die roll). Ignore results which show towns that have already mustered for the Rebels.

First 1D6 Roll result 1-3: First 1D6 Roll result 4-6:
1 Bristol 1 Exeter
2 Bath 2 Yeovil
3 Bridgwater 3 Dorchester
4 Taunton 4 Poole
5-6 roll again 5-6 roll again

3.1.2.2 All towns in which Government forces end their turns automatically possess Government friendly militias for the remainder of the game.

3.1.2.3 Effects: Towns with Government friendly militias mustered cannot be used as Rebel recruitment centres for the rest of the game. The militias have no combat strength per se, cannot move, and their towns can be entered and passed through freely by Rebel forces. Should Monmouth attempt to flee though a town containing Government friendly militia there is an increased chance of his capture (see Fleeing).

3.2 Rebel Operations Phase

All Rebel operations are conducted through their leader, the Duke of Monmouth (exception: Rebel Cavalry Movement, below). Monmouth may conduct ONE of two different operations per turn during this phase:

  • Major Muster
  • Move and/or Muster
  • On the March

3.2.1 Major Muster

Monmouth may attempt a major muster of rebel forces in any town in which he has ended his previous turn, providing the following conditions apply:

  • Monmouth must be present in that town,
  • He and his accompanying forces may not move that turn,
  • A muster has not previously been held in that town,
  • The town may not currently hold any Government forces or militia.

3.2.1.1 Procedure:

1. Monmouth delivers a rousing speech to the good (but simple) town folk. He distributes largess. Roll 1D6.

2. The result equals a number of additional D6s to be rolled.

3. The total of all of the additional D6s rolled times 50 equals the number of foot soldiers mustered. If there is an odd pip resulting from that total, those troops are cavalrymen.

Modifiers. The following modifiers to the above apply:

  • If Monmouth is conducting the muster in a large town, he rolls 2D6 initial dice instead of 1D6.
  • Once, and only once, during the game Monmouth may use a muster speech to openly declare himself King. In this instance (only) he may DOUBLE the amount of initial muster dice rolls he makes.

Example 1: Monmouth conducts a new major muster in Shepton Mallet, a small town. He rolls 1D6 and gets a two. He now rolls two dice and gets a five and four, totalling nine. He manages to recruit 400 foot and 50 horse (the odd pip). He and his accompanying forces may not move this turn.

Example 2: Monmouth conducts a major muster in Dorchester, a large town. He decides to take this opportunity to publicly declare himself to be King. He gets 2D6 for the large town, times two for his declaration, for a total of 4D6. He now rolls four dice and gets a total of 18. He rolls the 18 dice and scores 6,3,5,6,4,3,5,4,2,5,2,3,6,3,4,6,5, and 3 for a total of 75. He manages to recruit 3700 foot and 50 horse (the odd pip). These men are allocated to his various regiments. He and his accompanying forces may not move this turn. This will probably be his major recruiting effort of the campaign.

3.2.2 Move and/or Muster On the March

Monmouth may move together with, optionally, any force which accompany him at the start of a turn. Forces may not exceed their costed movement allowances. Monmouth may >drop off= forces at any point during movement. Forces which do not accompany Monmouth at the start of a turn may not move at all that turn (exception: see Rebel Cavalry Movement, below).

Monmouth may also attempt a hurried muster on the march in any towns through which he and his forces pass during his movement, providing the following conditions apply:

  • Monmouth must be present in that town,
  • A muster has not previously been held in that town,
  • The town may not currently hold any Government forces or militia.

3.2.2.1 Procedure:

  • Move through large town; roll 4D6 = total muster points,
  • Move through small town; roll 2D6 = total muster points.

3.2.3 Rebel Cavalry Movement

Rebel cavalry may be placed under the direct command of ONE leader other than Monmouth (example: Lord Grey), who may move independently. If so, they accompany that leader, and may conduct a single move (although NOT any musters) per turn with him.

3.3 Government Operations Phase

All operations of Government forces are conducted through their two leaders, Generals Feversham and Churchill.

Both of these two leaders may conduct ONE movement operation each per turn, together with, optionally, any forces which accompany them at the start of a turn. Forces movements may not exceed their costed movement allowances. Forces may be dropped off at any point during movement. Forces which do not accompany these leaders at the start of a turn may not move at all that turn. Government forces NEVER conduct musters.

3.3.1 Government and Rebel Movement Allowances and Costs

Allowance per Turn:   Costs:  
Single men & small groups on horse 48 Roads 2
Single men & small groups on foot 18 Cross-country 3
Cavalry 24 Fording river X 2
Foot, Guns, or Baggage 12    
Above rates modified by +/- the difference in 2D6      

3.4 Combat Phase

Combat is conducted on the tabletop using miniatures rules of the players= choice. Refer to these rules for set-up, etc.

4.0 Rebel Disasters

There are three specific disasters which may befall Rebel arms (apart from the regular misfortunes of war) during the course of the game:

  • A majority of Rebel forces have been routed,
  • Monmouth has been killed or captured,
  • Monmouth has clearly deserted his army.

Whenever any of the above occur, the Rebels must immediately roll 1D6 for every 600 rebels (rounded up) currently in arms. Multiply the result by 100, and subtract the resulting deserters from the Rebel Order of Battle. If Monmouth has been killed or captured, roll 2D6 instead of one.

5.0 Fleeing

At some point, it may become apparent to the player controlling Monmouth that all hope is lost, and there is nothing for it but to do a Harry Flashman and take to the tall timber (recall that the Rebels receive a draw if Monmouth escapes).

5.1 Monmouth is deemed to have escaped to the Continent if he manages to reach a port town and successfully takes to sea.

5.1.1 Procedure: During the Rebel Operations Phase Monmouth moves with any accompanying forces in the normal manner, ceasing movement when he reaches a desirable port. He then immediately attempts to escape by sea by rolling a 1D6 on the (what else?) >Speed Bonny Boat= chart, below.

If he moves as an individual or in a small group, Government forces may immediately conduct a variable number of capture attempts per turn:

  • One attempt each time Monmouth passes through a hex containing Government troops,
  • One attempt each time he passes though a town held by pro-Government militia,
  • One free attempt in any hex through which Monmouth passes.

The Government side rolls 1D6 per attempt. If a roll of six results, Monmouth is deemed to have been captured and is dragged off to London in chains, the miserable cur screaming for his life (see Rebel Disasters).

Modifiers to the above capture attempt roll:

+1 if the attempt is made on a road hex (high traffic),
+1 if Monmouth is on horseback (thus clearly visible)

If all of the attempted captures in a given turn fail, and if Monmouth successfully ends his move in a port town, he may try to escape by ship by rolling on the following Speed Bonny Boat chart:

Escape Port Location: 1D6: Result:
English Channel 1-3 Monmouth escapes.
  4-5 Ship forced back to a randomly selected port. Try sailing again next turn.
  6 Ship captured by Navy.
Bristol Channel 1-2 Monmouth escapes.
  3-4 Ship forced back to a randomly selected port. Try sailing again next turn.
  5-6 Ship captured by Navy.

Monmouth may not conduct any musters if fleeing as an individual or as part of a small group.

Note that Monmouth must attempt to escape by sea. If he exits the map to the east (with less than the required number of followers for victory), or to the north or west, he is deemed to have been automatically captured.

Note that the Fleeing rule can serve as a generator of skirmish level games.

6.0 Game Start and Set-up (Monmouth's Initial Landing)

Play begins with the Rebel Operations Phase, Turn One, June 15-16, 1685 (no events phase on turn one). It continues until a decision (as defined in Victory, below) is reached.

The game starts with Monmouth embarked off the French coast with his immediate circle of followers, Buyse's field battery, and enough weapons and provisions to supply his army's needs.

There are no Government forces on the map at start.

Monmouth must begin the game by deciding on an initial landing point. He may chose any port town on either the English or Bristol Channels, and rolls for landing on the Initial Landing Chart, below:

Landing Port Location: 1D6: Result:
Small Town on English Channel 1-5 Monmouth lands safely.
  6 Ship forced back to France by Navy or weather. Try again next turn.
Large Town on English Channel 1-4 Monmouth lands safely.
  5 Ship forced back to France by Navy or weather. Try again next turn.
  6 Ship captured by Navy.
Town on Bristol Channel
1-3 Monmouth lands safely.
  4-5 Ship forced back to France by Navy or weather. Try again next turn.
  6 Ship captured by Navy.

If Monmouth lands safely there are no further Rebel movements or mustering attempts on the first turn (see Rebel Operations). Play immediately proceeds to the beginning of Turn Two, June 17-18, 1685.

If the ship is forced back to France, play proceeds to the next turn (see Government Reaction, below).

If the ship (and Monmouth) is captured by the Navy, either end the game immediately with Monmouth in chains, or pull out your favourite set of miniatures naval warfare rules.

7.0 Government Reaction (Forces Activation)

The Government does not immediately respond to Monmouth=s landing. Begin to roll for the Government reaction during the Government Operations Phase, Turn Two, June 17-18. Roll on the James II Reaction Table, below:

Result on 1D6: Reaction:
1-5 no reaction
6 Government reacts (see table below)

The above is modified by a cumulative +1 every following turn (+1 on Turn Three, +2 on Turn Four, etc.).

Number of turns following Reaction: Forces enter from east edge of map:
Two turns Leader with Cavalry units
Four turns All other units

If playing a solitaire game, the Rebel player randomly rolls for the Government forces entry point when the units named above become available. Government forces then move directly towards the nearest available rebel force, seeking to bring it to battle.

If playing against another player, that player must secretly select an entry point at the time of Government reaction.

8.0 Victory

The game may end in one of three possible results:

  • Rebel Victory
  • Draw
  • Government Victory


A Rebel Victory is achieved if, at any point in the game, Monmouth exits the east edge of the map with a minimum of 5000 followers. Note that Government forces casualties count double towards this total. A groundswell of positive opinion is deemed to have carried Monmouth triumphantly to London, and a Scott now sits on the English throne.

Example: If the Rebel player currently has 3000 men in arms and has inflicted 1000 casualties on the Government forces (after any regrouping), the Rebel player has a current score of 5000.

A Draw occurs if, at any time during the game, Monmouth escapes by sea to the Continent.

The capture of Monmouth and suppression of the rebellion results in a Government Victory (bring on the Assizes).

Note that achieving a Monmouth victory isn't easy (what vainglorious, romantic lost cause ever is?). This being the case, the player(s) may wish to establish a victory index by which they can gauge the relative success of their various attempts. Assume that in any given game, the greatest number of rebel forces approaching nearest to the east edge of the map represents the high point of rebel success. Divide the number of rebels by the number of hexes to the east edge, and let this represent a victory index number.

Example: Say that Monmouth manages to get 5000 rebels to Frome (eight hexes from the eastern edge of the map), and that this is the closest he gets to ultimate victory in the current campaign. His victory index number will be 625; a reasonable benchmark for victory in future campaigns. (Note that making an initial landing at Poole, followed by a quick major muster definitely shows bad form.)

9.0 Orders of Battle

For the detailed order of battle refer to the King Monmouth Campaign Kit

9.1 Government Forces

Leaders

  • Commander-in-Chief: Lt-Gen. Louis Duras, Earl of Feversham
  • Second-in-Command: Maj-Gen. John, Lord Churchill

Horse

  • 1st Horse Guards, OC Col. Edward Villiers
  • Oglethorpe's Blues, OC Col. Lord Oglethorpe
  • King's Own Royal Dragoons, OC Col. John, Lord Churchill

Foot

  • 1st Bn. Royal Regiment of Guards, OC Duke of Grafton
  • 2nd Bn. Royal Regiment of Guards, OC Duke of Grafton
  • The King's Foot Guards, OC Col. Sackville
  • Dumbarton's Regiment of Foot, OC Lt-Col. Lord Douglas
  • Kirke's Regiment of Foot [Kirke=s Lambs], OC Col. Percy Kirke
  • Trelawney's Regiment of Foot, OC Lt-Col. Charles Churchill

Guns

  • 1st Battery, The Tower Train, OC Controller Henry Sheres
  • 2nd Battery, The Tower Train, OC Controller Henry Sheres

Militias

  • per town as listed

Notes on Government Forces:

The foot regiments listed above consist of a single battalion, with the exception of the Royal Regiment of Guards. The regular establishment of a battalion of foot at this time was c. 800 men deployed in 13 companies; 12 line, 1 grenadier. For the current campaign the battalions are under-strength, at c. 350 men each. The battalion line companies have about three musketeers to one pikeman, with the pikemen drawn together in single body in the middle of the battalion during action. Grenadier companies have no pikemen. Dumbarton's regiment is armed with the standard matchlock musket, equipped with a plug bayonet and fired without the older barrel rest that was common during the ECW era (this permits platoon fire). All of the other regiments of foot happen to be equipped with the rarer flintlock musket, also with plug bayonet. All of these regiments may be classed as veterans.

The two cavalry regiments are composed of c. 300 troopers each, in six troops. They are armed with straight swords and two flintlock horse pistols. They may be classed as veterans.

The dragoons are still mounted infantry during this period, and are thus equipped with flintlock muskets. They are armed with swords, and can flight as lesser quality cavalry if need be. They, too, are veterans.

The two batteries of guns are each composed of six medium-light field pieces. The gunners are technically not part of the army at all, and are classed as trained civilians. The guns are drawn by draught animals.

9.2 Rebel Forces

Leaders

  • Commander-in-Chief: Capt-Gen. James Scott, Duke of Monmouth
  • Second-in-Command: Lord Grey of Warke
  • Army Chaplain: Rev. Robert (the Scotch Plotter) Ferguson

Horse (The following begin as empty cadres, with no troops:)

  • Lord Grey's Regiment of Horse, OC Lord Grey of Warke
  • Jones' Regiment of Horse, OC Capt. Jones
  • Hucker's Regiment of Horse, OC Capt. Hucker

Foot (The following begin as empty cadres, with no troops:)

  • Wade's Red Regiment of Foot, OC Maj. Nathaniel Wade
  • Foulkes' White Regiment of Foot, OC Col. John Foulkes
  • Mathews' Yellow Regiment of Foot, OC Col. Edward Mathews
  • Holmes' Greene Regiment of Foot, OC Col. Abraham Holmes
  • Bovet's Blue Regiment of Foot, Col. Richard Bovet
  • other regiments of foot, as needed

Guns

  • The Battery of Anton (the Dutch Gunner) Buyse 

Notes on Rebel Forces:

The above are paper establishments to which mustered troops are added during the course of the campaign.

For game purposes, each foot regiment is composed of 200-600 men. One-third of each regiment are armed with older matchlocks, one-third are pikemen, and one-third scythe men (troops with scythes, pitchforks, cudgels, etc). Consider being generous and allow these troops to be classified as trained regulars to account for their high morale.

Rebel cavalry are a mixed bag. Count them all as lightly armed raw troops.

The Rebel guns are light field pieces manned by trained gunners, and drawn by draught animals.

To download the King Monmouth Campaign Kit, which includes maps, counters and the order of battle click here. Note, this is a large download. To reduce traffic to this site I would ask only people who are serious about this campaign download this file.